08-12-2015

Why I Love 400 Repeats + Backyard Workout Video

On Monday I had a track workout that might have been the most challenging track workout I’ve ever done. It wasn’t so much that I felt like I was pushing myself to the max (like some workouts where you “go to the well”) but it was just a non-stop workout with minimal break…Thanks Coach Marc!

My mom and I did a 1.5 mile warmup, then 12x400s at 2:05 average per lap with only 25 seconds break in between, THEN 2 more 400s at 1:50ish but with a longer break, then 1 mile cooldown. We were supposed to do 4 total of the 1:50 laps but we only did 2 because I was so beat I couldn’t hold the pace any longer.

Running those 400s at 2:05 was hard I knew I wasn’t running 100% effort. The hard part was that as soon as you finished, you only had 25 seconds before you had to go off again. My sister went to be our official timer :)

I started the first few closer to 2:10, just to get a feel. I have never done 12 400s in a row…let alone with such little break…so I was kind of nervous.

This was the exact workout I needed though after a few iffy weeks of training where I just felt slow and off. I wanted this as a confidence booster. I love 400 repeats and they always make me feel fast and strong. Here are a few reasons you should incorporate them into your training too:

  • Even if you’re marathon training, 400s (or any track workout) will benefit you greatly. It will help improve your speed, strength and leg turnover. With shorter breaks like I did, you’ll challenge yourself to hold a faster than marathon pace pace (did that make sense?) so that your usual marathon pace will then feel “easier” come race day.
  • There are all sorts of variations of 400s you can do based on what you’re training for. Coach Marc is the perfect person to ask about this. You can do faster 400s with more breaks in between, slower 400s with minimal break, or a combination of both. Even many elites do combinations of paces. For example, I’ve seen videos of Brenda Martinez‘s workouts where she’ll do sets of 400s or 800s, then finish with a “tag” aka a 400 at 100% effort. Like I said, it all comes down to what you’re training for.

I slept like a baby Monday night AND last night because this workout really tired me out. No joke, I could have gone to sleep at 8 pm last night if I didn’t have stuff to do.

Anyway, I also put out a new workout video on my YouTube channel today! It’s a workout you can do right in your backyard, and it targets your lower body (with some cardio thrown in). Check it out:

Make sure to make it higher quality on YouTube by clicking 780 or 1080P :)

Let me know if you try it out!

Do you love or hate track workouts? What’s your favorite distance?

If you’re on YouTube, please subscribe to my channel! Will be adding many new videos :)

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02-26-2015

Does The Fat Burning Zone Still Exist?

Last week I was at a spin class, and the instructor had us do a steady ride for a song or two, and said we’d be burning more calories in this aerobic pace because we were in the fat burning zone. Then she said we should come to her endurance ride because it would be 90 minutes in the fat burning zone. I was thinking to myself, “Wait what? Is the fat burning zone still a thing?” I haven’t heard that terminology in forever, so I started doing some research…aka Googling :-P

Does the fat burning zone still exist? Or is HIIT better?

From what I remembered, the fat burning zone was maintain your heart rate at a certain rate in order to burn the most fat/calories. So why is this the case, supposedly? Here’s a great explanation from Active:

The fat-burning zone is a concept that the body burns a greater amount of fat at lower-intensity aerobic exercise than it does at higher intensities. Actually, the body burns a greater percentage of fat at lower intensities than at higher intensities. At lower intensities the body may burn 50 percent of the calories from fat, while at higher intensities it may only burn 35 percent. But at higher intensities you burn way more total calories—and more fat calories overall—than you do at lower intensities.

Very interesting. And that’s what I was thinking in the class. We did a lot of hill rides and sprints and in my mind, that probably burns more calories overall than a steady pace. Furthermore, us runners know that the more you do something at a certain pace/rate, the more your body adapts. If you’re in the aerobic zone for every workout for months, eventually you will plateau. Speaking of plateau, I wrote about a few ways to beat that pesky plateau a while ago.

Let’s also talk about the afterburn effect. You may have read in plenty of fitness magazines that the reason HIIT (high intensity interval training) is so beneficial is because of the afterburn. For hours after you’re done exercising, your body continues to burn calories, whereas after aerobic exercises, there isn’t much of an afterburn. In a study done by the University of Maine, “A low intensity exercise group cycled at a steady rate of 3.5 minutes. The higher intensity exercise group required three 15 second sprints as fast as the subjects could run.”

What were the results?

The cycling group burned 29 calories vs. 4 calories for the sprinting group during the exercise. But when you take into account the calories burned after exercise, or the afterburn effect, the numbers look much different – 39 calories burned for the cycling group vs. 65 calories burned for the sprinting group. A surprising 95% of the total calorie burn occurred after the sprinting exercise!2 Keep in mind the cycling group exercised for almost 5x longer than the sprint group (3.5 minutes vs. 45 seconds).

I’ll admit, sometimes when I do a quick hill sprint session on the treadmill and I’m done in 15-20 minutes, I feel like I should keep exercising. But it’s clear that HIIT training really does have more “bang for your buck.” Why slog along on a treadmill for hours (okay maybe that’s an exaggeration) when you could do circuit training or HIIT and be done in 20-30 minutes (and reap the same benefits if not better)?

Obviously, this all doesn’t relate to those of us who are training for a long distance race. That is always the conundrum I have. I want to burn more fat and get leaner, but I’m be training for a half marathon or a marathon, so long, steady state cardio is my life at the moment, other than track workout or tempo days. Though I have started doing circuit training for strength workouts that are high intensity and last 30 minutes. I’ve loved it so far, and it’s a good change of pace from my usual lifting routine. Here’s an example of a workout I do.

Have you heard the term “fat burning zone” used recently?

What do you think of it vs. HIIT?

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02-05-2015

Day 1 of Morning Exercise

And probably the only day this week…maybe I’ll do it again next week ;)

But yeah, I woke up at 6:30 today to run before work…probably not a big deal to most of you but I’m SO not a morning person and never workout in the AM because I feel like a zombie. 6:30 probably isn’t even that early to some of you (I know some people are up at 4:30 am to workout) but it’s early for me. My usual wake up time before work is 7:30 AM and even then I snooze for 10 minutes before dragging myself out of bed.

Today I made myself just get up and go. I had my stuff packed already for the day so I just had to pack my oatmeal and snacks for the day. I thought, I can go and run for 30 minutes, that’s all I need to do.

So what motivated this change? A great article I read yesterday, The Brutally Honest 6 Reasons You’re Still Overfat, which I quoted on my Instagram (pardon the language):

 

A photo posted by pattyrivas13 (@pattyrivas13) on


It’s a longer read but worth it, especially if you need a kick in the butt. He talks about people making excuses (well, my coworkers brought in donuts so I ate a few) as opposed to owning it (I chose to eat donuts). While I know it’s my own fault my nutrition isn’t as good as it should be, I know that I’ve been guilty of making excuses before, especially the likes of “Well, I worked out for an hour so I can eat this cookie.”

He also talks about sacrifice…and if you really want something, you’ll suck it up and make a sacrifice to get there. My sacrifice today was that extra hour of sleep. I want to lose a few of the extra pounds that I have gained, and I need to take charge and do it as opposed to bi*ching and moaning about getting up early, or being too tired to run, etc. I’m soooo guilty of making excuses when I’m tired…just yesterday I skipped the gym because I was tired after a bad night’s sleep. Then I got home and read this post and was like, ugh…should have just gone to the gym!

Here are a few other points I liked from the article:

  • “This applies not just to fat loss but also to the rest of your health and fitness goals. If you blame yourself – success. If you blame everything else – no success. Period.”
  • “Life isn’t fair. Life is hard. You will get out of it what you put into it. And when you decide to make real changes, when you make a commitment to yourself to make a difference, YOU HAD BETTER STICK TO IT.”

  • “‘Treats’ are something out of the ordinary. If it happens more than once a month it is no longer out of the ordinary. Stop saying treat. You aren’t having a treat.”
  • It is awesome to have targets and goals. In fact it is imperative to have targets and goals. But those are simply markers, stepping stones, to the ultimate goals, which should be health and fitness until the day you die.”
  • It is either a workout you have to do or a celebration of the amazing gift your healthy body is.”

Some people don’t like this kind of in your face motivation but I love it. Sometimes I just need that kick in the butt and reminder that I’m lucky to be healthy and even able to exercise…so why complain about doing it?

Now, I can’t promise I will be regularly waking up at 6:30 am to run, but I’m going to try at least ONCE next week to do it again. I feel great right now sitting at work, and more energized than I ever feel in the mornings when I get here. Will I be more tired later though? I guess I’ll find out :)

Do you exercise in the mornings? What tips do you have for me for dragging myself out from under my warm covers?

What kind of stuff motivates you? Do you like the aggressive, in your face approach?

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01-14-2015

Health & Fitness Links To Get You Through The Day

Have you ever tried a new workout and a few days later you’re STILL sore?? I started a new plan Monday and still can’t walk right! It’s more focused on time than sets and reps (aka you’re out of breath the whole time), so we’ll see how it goes. I’ll keep you posted!

I haven’t done a link roundup in a few weeks…I got all discombobulated with the holidays so let’s get back into it.

Featured: Apple Cinnamon Blender Waffles (The Lean Green Bean)

Apple-Cinnamon-Blender-Waffles
How amazing do those look? I have been wanting a waffle maker for a while…I seriously need to get one. This recipe is so simple and quick…perfect for those lazy weekend mornings.

  • 2 Steps To Make Healthy Eating A Reality (Love Live Surf) – Two great tips here. I need to do better with meal prep. Mainly lunches. Do any of you prepare all your meals ahead of time?
  • Hip Hugger Lower Body Burner (Running Escapades) – Definitely need to add this to my routine once I start running more. But anyone can benefit…strong hips = strong core!
  • Italian Chickpea Casserole (Strength & Sunshine) – This looks delicious and like the perfect meatless dish if you’re looking for one. I will be trying this for sure, especially now that Dan’s resolution is to eat healthier/more veggies :)
  • Make Your Gym Habits Stick (Dare You To…) – Did you make a New Year’s Resolution? These tips will help! I always prepare my gym clothes and bag the night before. Even though I’m not a morning exerciser, it’s right by the door so I don’t forget anything in that morning rush, and have it all ready to go for my workout later in the day.
  • Grocery Shopping On A Budget For One (Lake Shore Runner) – I’ve found that now that I’m mainly buying groceries for myself, it’s a totally different experience in terms of weekly budgeting, buying things that won’t go bad, etc. Question: If you live alone or with a roommate, how do you buy salad in the bags and have it not go bad??? Happens to me every week.

How do you prevent your groceries and veggies from going bad? Do you have a weekly grocery budget?

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01-12-2015

How To Motivate Yourself To Workout

I’ve seen many posts about gym resolutioners and people who are starting to work on being healthier and fitter…awesome! I’ve also seen a lot of posts in the past about finding a workout buddy in order to hold yourself accountable and get workouts done. But what if you don’t have one? You may want to take spin or run regularly, yet none of your friends are interested. That’s where these tips on how to motivate yourself to workout come in.

As awesome as it is for me to regularly work out with my mom, there are many days where our schedules don’t coincide, so I need to either run or lift alone. And some days I am severely lacking in motivation to go to the gym or run alone. Here are a few things that have helped me:

5 Ways To Motivate Yourself To Workout

Just go for 20 minutes. On days where I REALLY don’t want to workout, I tell myself I’ll do it for 20 minutes. Whether it’s a 20 minute video, 20 minutes at the gym, or a 20 minute run. Recently I did a 25 minute video, and once it was over I was feeling good so I drove to the gym to continue my workout. I bet you, 9 times out of 10, once those 20 minutes are up, you’ll want to keep working out. 

Text a friend. When my mom and I can’t workout or run together, we always Snapchat each other. Yes, Snapchat :-P I’ll send her a photo of my treadmill readout when I’m done and she’ll do the same. There have been plenty of times where I’ve gone or she’s gone and the other person says “Yeah I’ll probably skip today,” but then ends up going to the gym once we see the other person is there. Enlist a friend to be the one who encourages you and provides you with support when you need it. Just the act of sending “proof” to someone can motivate you to get yourself to the gym.

Instagram. So this actually happened last night…before bed I’m using the “explore” feature on Instagram to find new people to follow and ended up finding a few. I started scrolling through their pictures, and learning about their story, their results, their daily nutrition, etc. I was feeling super motivated to get my workout in today (was even going to wake up at 6:30 to do it but we all know I’m not a morning person), and even had all these dreams about going to the gym. Maybe it’s just me, but seeing other people’s results and hard work on Instagram are a huge motivator. Whether it’s their results from following a specific workout plan, or their journey to a BQ…I love seeing pictures and using that to fuel my own fire. Some hashtags I regularly go through are #fitfluential #runnersofinstagram #sweatpink and #runchat.

Try a new class. When I’m feeling really blah and lazy, I check out the group exercise schedule at my gym and pick a new one to try. That’s actually how I found BodyPump (and ended up loving it). You don’t have to do any of the (mental) work, like putting together a plan, picking out weights, etc. Just go to the class and follow instructions. And you might just find your new favorite class!

Take before pictures. Nothing motivates me more than wanting to have “after” pictures. Take before pictures and when you start forgetting about your goals, go through the pictures. I’m not saying to be self-deprecating here and hate on your body…but we all have things we may want to work on. For example, for me, I want stronger and more defined arms and abs. Seeing before pictures is a reminder of it. You can’t get what you want without putting in the work. If you’re a runner, then do a time trial test. Run a mile or a 5K and use that as your benchmark. You’ll want to improve in X amount of weeks and break that time.

Right now, my goals are simply to start lifting again and get back some strength. I always end up losing it once I start training for a half marathon or marathon…this will be the year I stop doing that! I found a workout plan I want to follow…and once I get into the regimen and do it for a few weeks, I’ll share what it is, my thoughts and any possible results. 

How do you self-motivate? Is it easy for you to workout alone or do you have a workout/running buddy?

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12-10-2014

Health & Fitness Links To Get You Through The Day

Holy moly…in exactly 2 weeks it is Christmas Eve! I have done like 1% of my Christmas shopping…anyone done already? If so, way to go…I always end up waiting until the last minute.

Today’s featured link is a really cute/nice video…it’s not health or fitness related but it put a smile on my face! Can I get pulled over today and given a present? :)

Featured: Christmas Surprise Traffic Stop

Isn’t that nice? I’m way jealous of the girl who got the iPad…and the girl who got the New Balance sneakers…because, running. 

Here are more links for you to check out today:

  • Holiday Gift Guide: Under $35 (Nutritious Eats) – For those of you who are still shopping like me…and this reminded me I would like a new pair of fleece PJs!
  • Arms on Fire (Running Escapades) – Looking for an upper body workout? Try this one – all you need are dumbbells.
  • Super Simple DIY Medal & Bib Holder (Erica D. House) – I definitely want to make a medal holder. I love this idea.
  • Become A Morning Workout Person (Lake Shore Runner) – This just won’t happen for me, but if you’re making some resolutions, this may help you!
  • Yoga Core Workout (Apples & Arteries) – Definitely trying this 20 minute video today or tomorrow.

How’s your holiday shopping going? Have you treated yourself to anything? I bought some “fiber” mascara from Sephora yesterday to try out :)

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11-05-2014

Health & Fitness Links To Get You Through The Day

I feel like I say this every Wednesday but this year is flying by!! How are Christmas decorations already up?? Dan and I are debating on getting a Christmas tree…I personally think it’s a hassle and am not super gung-ho on Christmas decorating, so we’ll see ;)

Okay here are some great links for you to read today!

Featured: Quick (better than nothing) Treadmill Workout – Comfy Confident

Quick-Treadmill-Workout

 

Sometimes, you only have 20 minutes. But that’s still better than nothing. This is a great treadmill workout to try out. I’d probably also add in some different inclines if you want to make it even more challenging!

Do you run outside in the winter or resort to the treadmill? Or not run at all? Because last winter I didn’t run whatsoever :-P

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10-02-2014

Why You Should Keep A Training Log

Do you track your training – whether it’s lifting, running, cycling, etc.? If not…you should!

Using a training log helps you keep track of your progress. I love being able to look on old notes to see how far I’ve come, as well as what I’ve lost or what weaknesses to work on. For example, a few months ago I can look back and see that I couldn’t do any unassisted pull-ups. Well, now I can do 4.5. Though not in a row…I need a 1-2 min. break in between each one, but still ;)

I keep a training log when it comes to my lifting AND my running. So I want to talk about how you can use one for both of these different activities.

Training LogPhoto Credit: Jonathan Rubio via Compfight cc

RUNNING LOG

There are many ways to keep track of your running. You can use a good ol’ notebook, or online tools like Google docs or Daily Mile. I try to keep up with Daily Mile but I’m really bad at updating it.

Benefits of keeping a training log for running are:

  • You’re able to see how consistent you are with training (or inconsistent which has happened to me).
  • If you’re a numbers person, seeing increasing mileage and paces can help motivate you
  • You can track how you feel on runs. If you have been feeling a certain way on certain runs, write it down. You may see patterns.
  • You can track amount of time spent running, as well as cross training and lifting.
  • Once the season is over, you can review your log and see what you did well vs. what you can work on next season.

The tool I work with is Google docs, because that’s what Coach Marc has me use. His training log is seriously awesome. I am able to see my year in review, my training plan, and each month broken down into miles I’ve ran (based on what I put in obviously).

He has a notes section where I can write how I felt in each run (which he reviews to tweak my plan as time goes on). It’s so funny reading notes from my 2011 log before my first marathon. And also funny to see how my training has progressed so much since then.

Here’s a screenshot of the “year in review” section:

training log
I think it’s cool you can see previous months AND years miles. This version of his is newer from the ones I was using since 2011 which is why my yearly miles don’t show up.

Oh also, you can input what shoes you wear so you can track how many miles they have. No more forgetting when to replace your shoes!

Each month tab on the bottom allows you to input your miles, pace, shoes work, notes and more. See below:

running log
Pretty cool right? The cooler thing is you don’t have to be coached by Marc to have access to this training log. He sells them on his site. He also has a special offer for you all: if you buy the 2015 log, he’ll give you the 2014 log for free, so you’ll be set for the rest of this year and next year. Just mention my blog in the comments of his order form :)

Even if you don’t order one, start using a running log for yourself. You may be surprised at the results, and you may even improve your running! Make sure to track miles, type of run, pace, how you felt and what sneakers you wore.

Lifting Log

Okay so you don’t run? No problem. A log is just as important in strength training…maybe even more important. You don’t want to be one of those people who goes to the gym day in and day out, does the same workout, and never sees results, right? Not keeping a training log can lead to a plateau.

Here are the benefits of keeping a lifting log:

  • You can track what weights you use for every exercise. This means as the weeks go by you can steadily increase your weight, as opposed to forgetting what weights you used for what, or staying at the same weight.
  • You can track what workouts/exercises you do on certain days.
  • You can track sets, reps, and tempo. If you’ve done the same number of sets and reps for 4 weeks, it’s time to switch it up.
  • You can write notes about how you felt during lifting sessions. For example, I write down “felt good” so I know that the following week I need to increase my weights. Or I write “Stay” which means to stay at the current weight I’m using because it’s challenging.

For my lifting log I am old school and go with a notebook and pen. I have a small notepad I bring to the gym, but then I transpose everything when I get home to my bigger notebook. Yes I could use an app or the Note app on my phone but I like pen and paper for this.

Here’s what my lifting log looks like:

PS – the middle row is my brother’s weights. I wish I could bench 75 lbs.

Anyways, the information I like to write down is the exercise (and what exercise it was paired with in a set), number of sets, number of reps, tempo if I’m using one, and weights. On the right you see I have W,R,W,R repeated (for weight and rep). That denotes the number of sets. This is my system to remember how many reps I did on a certain set, because if I get to the last one and can only do 8 reps as opposed to 10, I need to remember that for next week. Did all that blabbering just make sense?

I looked up strength training log and a lot of things came up. Find one that works for you. I haven’t used this tool, but BodyBuilding.com offers a custom log creation tool. Check it out!

No matter what your workout is, keeping a log is important. Even if you don’t care about numbers or stats, wouldn’t it be cool to look back in a few years and see how much progress you’ve made? It’s almost like a diary (oh man I don’t even want to read my middle school diary). I look back on my first lifting logs ever and see that I could barely dumbbell press 10 lbs. That makes me feel awesome about how far I’ve come.

Do you keep a training log? Did you keep a diary as a kid? :-P

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09-18-2014

10 Things To Do Before & After Your Next Track Workout

Track workouts are awesome…at least in my opinion. I soooo much rather prefer a track workout over a long run.

Whether you’re a beginner runner or not, we could all use these reminders before our next track workout. I’m the worst with warming up and cooling down, but recently I’ve had my cross country runners going through a certain routine, which has made me want to “practice what I preach.”

Track Workout Tips

BEFORE

Eat something. Make sure you have enough fuel in the tank to do the work. Nothing is more frustrating (to me at least) than being pumped for a workout but stopping or slowing down halfway because I feel lightheaded or weak. Make sure to eat a good meal or snack beforehand, depending on what time you’re doing the workout.

Warm-up. If you’re anything like me, you slack on the warm-up before runs. You just get up and go…well I do. And hey, Jenny Simpson told me she does too ;) But the warm-up is so important when it comes to doing any type of speed workout. You want your muscles and joints to be primed for the action. They need to be warm and loose. Coach Marc usually has me doing a 1 mile warm up before any sort of workout.

Do a dynamic warm-up. Okay, so you did your 1 mile warm-up. But you’re not ready to go yet. Now it’s time for dome dynamic movements. I have my cross-country team do a series of moves before a workout or meet, which I wrote about here. This includes A-skips, butt kicks, mummy walks, cariocas and more. When I was personal training, I had clients go through these movements as well. It’s another way to get your joints ready and loosen up the muscles through your range of motion.

Strides. Before a workout or race I like to do a few strides, or pick-ups. Once again, it just helps loosen you up a bit and get you acclimated to that faster speed you’re about to run. Do anywhere from 3-5 for about 50 meters. Marc has me do them after runs too just do get in a little speed at the end of a run.

AFTER

Cool down. I actually hate the cool down more than the warm up. When I’m done with a hard effort, all I want to do is go home and collapse on the floor or couch. But a cool down is so important for your muscles and heart. It gradually brings your heart rate back down and will prevent your muscles from tightening up or being too sore the next day. I usually do anywhere from a half mile to a mile cool down after workouts. Pace doesn’t matter!

Stretching. Once you’re done with your cool down, it’s time for some stretching and more dynamic stretches. Before getting into static stretches, I have my runners do some mummy walks and skips. It helps get everything flowing and also stretches the muscles. Once you’re done, go through a stretching routine. I switch it up between certain yoga routines or my own routine, but stretches I always do are calf stretches, quad stretches, pigeon pose, and hamstring stretches.

Hydrate. This one is obvious right? You just had a hard effort. Drink some water!!

Protein. Within 30 minutes of any workout, whether it’s running or lifting, you should be eating a recovery meal or drink. If I’m having a shake, I have PlantFusion, which is my all-time favorite protein powder. Getting in protein right away will help with muscle recovery, which means you’ll be ready to go (and stronger) or your next workout.

Pre-hab or rehab. If you have a nagging ache or pain like I do (shins), speed workouts may make it worse. My shins are always sore after track or tempo workouts. Monitor yourself for any sort of pain and do the proper rehab right away. Don’t wait! For example, I had a track workout two days ago and right when I got home I made sure to massage my calves and shins with Biofreeze.

Foam roll. This kind of goes with the pre-hab, but while you’re watching TV after a workout, get on the foam roller or tennis ball. Your muscles will probably be tight, and a foam roller will help work out those knots. You don’t want to be tight for your next track workout! I love sitting on a tennis ball and self-massaging my glutes…even though it hurts SO much.

I just did a track workout on Tuesday and I felt awesome! Coach had me doing 8×400 and I told him I felt on fire!! 

When’s your next track workout? What kind of warm-up do you do beforehand?

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07-30-2014

How To: Medicine Ball Slams + Workout

If you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, then you may have seen my picture tutorial on how to do medicine ball slams:

Medicine Ball Slams

 Medicine ball slams are a great exercise because it’s a full body workout. You’re working your legs and upperbody, and getting in some cardio too. You may feel silly at first doing this in a gym (I did), but it will make you feel bad@$$ ;) I have seen a lot of people doing it at the gym too, so don’t think you’re the only one. Below are the steps + a video tutorial, but keep reading for a full medicine ball workout as well!

Here are the steps:

  1. Semi squat down as if you’re preparing to jump. Keep your core tight and flat back…same form as if you were doing regular squats.
  2. Bring the ball up over your head and prepare to slam it down. As you can see in my picture, I’m on my toes as I prepare to slam it down. You don’t want to just bring it over your head – have some power to it! Be careful not to hyper-extend your back.
  3. Slam the ball down as hard as you can, and again you will end in that semi-squat position. Catch the ball on the rebound and repeat.

For those of you who like video tutorials:

Here’s a workout to try next time you’re at the gym. All you need is the medicine ball!

Medicine Ball Workout

For the tricep extensions, it’s the same thing as if you were holding a dumbbell. See below (minus the lunge):

Med-Ball-Lunge-with-Tricep

 

And medicine ball twists are your standard seated ab exercise. Make sure you keep your chest up and shoulders back the hold time. Twist solely with your arms, not your spine.

Do the routine for 3-5 sets through, or do as many rounds as possible in 20 minutes…let me know which one you do!

Have you incorporated medicine ball slams into your routine? 

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